Operations | Monitoring | ITSM | DevOps | Cloud

September 2021

Understanding Lambda Sleep Cycles With CONCURRENCY

It started with a simple question: Why did one query take 10 seconds, while another almost identical query took 5? At Honeycomb, we use AWS Lambda to accelerate our query processing. It mostly works well, but it can be hard to understand and led us to wonder: What was really going on inside this box called Lambda? These questions kicked off the development of CONCURRENCY, a new aggregate in the Query Builder that lets us look at how many spans are active at once.

Announcing Support for AWS Lambda Functions running on AWS Graviton2 processors

AWS Graviton2 processors use the Arm architecture to provide high-efficiency, low-cost computing. AWS already offers the ability to provision EC2 instances powered by Graviton2, and Datadog is proud to partner with them for the launch of new Graviton2 compute resources for Lambda functions. In this post, we’ll discuss how Datadog can provide deep visibility into your Lambda functions across whichever platform you’re using.

Next Generation AWS Lambda Functions Powered by AWS Graviton2 Processors

Modern computing has come a long way in the last couple of years and the introduction of new technologies is only accelerating the rate of advancements. From the immense compute power at our disposal to lightning-fast networks and ready-made services, the opportunities are limitless. In such a fast-paced world, we can’t ignore economics.

Graviton-Based Lambda Functions, What It Means For You

AWS just announced support for AWS Lambda functions powered by AWS Graviton2 processors. These are 64-bit Arm-based processors that are custom built by AWS and offer a better price to performance ratio. In this post, let me take through what we have learnt about this new option and what it means for you.

Sumo Logic Extends Monitoring for AWS Lambda Functions Powered by AWS Graviton2 Processors

Organizations are constantly trying to maintain pace with users' expectations and desires from a digital experience. These users expect an experience that constantly changes based on their preferences and behavior, which means innovating quickly and improving software is critical to user happiness and driving business success.

Import ECS Fargate into Spot Ocean

AWS Fargate is a serverless compute engine for containers that work with both Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS) and Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS). With Fargate handling instance provisioning and scaling, users don’t have to worry about spinning up instances when their applications need resources. While this has many benefits, it’s not without its share of challenges which can limit its applicability to a wide variety of use cases.

Serverless benefits for startups

I’ve had a great conversation with a buddy of mine who is launching a new service, and while he is not a technical person, he came up to me asking about serverless and if it could have an actual impact on his startup. Naturally, I got very excited about the topic and proceeded to list all the benefits of serverless technology and how decentralized technology has revolutionized the industry, so on so forth. After a 15-minute monologue, the guy stops me and politely asks me the question again.

Ensure First Come First Served using Azure Service Bus

One of the patterns easily supported by the Azure Service Bus is the first-in-first-out (FIFO) pattern, which isn’t supported in the other queue service – Azure Storage Queues. To realise FIFO with the Azure Service Bus is to use sessions. Any service can create a session when sending a message to a queue or topic by setting the SessionId property. Subsequently, the session comes into existence when the queue or topic is session aware, which means you have specified ‘Enable session’ when creating the queue or topic.

Top 6 AWS Lambda Monitoring Tools

Monitoring AWS Lambda performance plays a crucial part in your everyday AWS Lambda usage. Monitoring helps you identify any performance issues, and it can also send you alerts and notify you of anything you might need to know. The world is slowly getting to a point where machines and computers will be flawless, but until then, if we let them perform various tasks for us, we could at least monitor their performance.

Ensure First Come First Server using Azure Service Bus

One of the patterns easily supported by the Azure Service Bus is the first-in-first-out (FIFO) pattern, which isn’t supported in the other queue service – Azure Storage Queues. To realise FIFO with the Azure Service Bus is to use sessions. Any service can create a session when sending a message to a queue or topic by setting the SessionId property. Subsequently, the session comes into existence when the queue or topic is session aware, which means you have specified ‘Enable session’ when creating the queue or topic.

AWS Lambda vs Azure Functions vs Google Cloud Functions

Serverless computing is on the rise, having already earned the mantle of “The Next Big Thing”. For developers, serverless computing means less concern regarding infrastructure when deploying code, as all computing resources are dynamically provisioned by the cloud provider. Pricing is generally on a pay-as-you-use model and is based on resources consumed – which is in line with modern business principles of “on-demand”, flexibility and rapid scaling.

Tracing AWS Lambdas with OpenTelemetry and Elastic Observability

Open Telemetry represents an effort to combine distributed tracing, metrics and logging into a single set of system components and language-specific libraries. Recently, OpenTelemetry became a CNCF incubating project, but it already enjoys quite a significant community and vendor support. OpenTelemetry defines itself as “an observability framework for cloud-native software”, although it should be able to cover more than what we know as “cloud-native software”.